Screenshot of Raspberry Ultra Drops Facebook Hack

Screenshot of Raspberry Ultra Drops Facebook Hack

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Is Raspberry Ultra Drops Hacking Your Facebook Account?

Is Raspberry Ultra Drops a miracle weight loss diet supplement or a Facebook hacking scam? If you use Facebook, chances are you’ve seen a post like this on your Timeline:

Facebook comment from a hacked account reading: “Amazing news Friend, I’m already 18 pounds thinner! For the past few weeks I have lost so much weight. I’ve been taking these new Raspberry drops I saw on Dr Oz. It really worked for me, let me know how it works for you  Check the site out, type in without spaces”

Even if you’re not on Facebook, Raspberry Ultra Drops have also been making the rounds on a website spoofing Fox News Health. It’s titled Raspberry Ultra Drops To Help Your Weight Drop. If this sounds familiar, it might be thanks to another diet product, HCG Ultra. HCG Ultra Drops used a nearly identical fake Fox News review to sell its products back in September.

Let’s take a closer look at Raspberry Ultra Drops and review the claims reported by real Scambook users.

 

Raspberry Ultra Drops in a Nutshell

  • Top trending Scambook complaint, with 100 complaints reported as of 11/28/12.
  • Raspberry Ultra Drops are marketed as a diet supplement, which claims to use “raspberry ketones” and anti-oxidants to help you lose weight. Claims include losing “1-2 pounds daily” or “18 pounds in 2 weeks”.
  • Websites associated with Raspberry Ultra Drops, including www.RaspDiet.com and Raspberrybuy.ru, are often shut down without notice and replaced by new websites.
  • Scambook users report a connection between Raspberry Ultra Drops and email and Facebook hacking. Users receive emails or Facebook posts from friends who have been allegedly hacked. The “friend” writes about their miraculous weight loss using Raspberry Ultra Drops and includes a link to the fake Fox News review page or another page offering a free 30 day trial.
  • Scambook users who have ordered the trial report being charged for a full order before the 30 day trial period expires. Other Scambook users say they bought a full order, were charged, but never received the product.
  • Users also report that they can’t reach the company to cancel or return the product.

 

A fake Fox News Health page promoting Raspberry Ultra Drops. It’s virtually identical to another site promoting HCG Ultra.

 

Actual Scambook User Comments

Here’s what our users are saying about Raspberry Ultra Drops and its subsidiary products, Raspberry Ketones and Liquid Raspberry Ketone Burn:

This website has hacked into my Facebook account and is posting comments to all my friends that I have lost 18 pounds using raspberry diet drops. It sounds like I am happy with this product and that I am promoting it. I don’t know how they can use my Facebook name and photo [source]

Friends FB page was hacked by this company. I paid via credit card and never received. There is no company contact and no way to speak to anyone. I keep receiving spam advertising from the company even after I un subscribed. I tried their invalid email address to report abuse and it doesn’t work! Next thing I know, I am hacked!!!!!!!! [source]

I also fell for this scam. They advertise for you to try this product for only 4.95. You buy it online and then a week later, they charge your account 89.99. It is a pyramid scam, this is how they make money. When I called, I waited almost 45 min to talk to someone. I was basically told that there was no way I would ever get my money back. It is under their “terms and conditions”….very small print at the bottom of the page. I didnt even see it until the representative I was talking to pointed it out. They could at least post this in an area where you can see while you are paying. Total scam. I would like my money back. [source]

 

But Do Raspberry Ultra Drops Work?

I haven’t tried Raspberry Ultra Drops and I’m not a medical expert, so I won’t weigh in on whether or not the product can actually help you lose weight. But WebMD expresses doubts about the key ingredient in Raspberry Ultra Drops, the raspberry ketones.

“There have been no human studies so far on the weight loss effects of raspberry ketones,” says WebMD. “Until it has, experts say you’re better off holding onto your money.”

Raspberry ketones are often found in foods or cosmetics as a flavoring agent, but nobody really knows how the concentrated supplements affect the human body. WebMD also notes that some people who have taken raspberry ketone supplements claim to experience side effects such as “jitteriness, increased blood pressure, and rapid heartbeat.”

 

What To Do If You or Your Friend Has Been Hacked

The image I posted above is a real screen capture from my own Facebook account. When I first saw the comment posted on my friend’s Timeline, I didn’t think much of it. I don’t know “B.F.”, so maybe he’s actually dieting and seeing amazing results from Raspberry Ultra Drops.

Then I reviewed the trending data on Scambook and, sure enough, there’s a hundred complaints about www.RaspDiet.com and Raspberry Ultra Drops. And many of our user testimonials mention a hacked Facebook account or a hacked email. Suddenly, I felt sure that “B.F.” didn’t lose 18 pounds with this diet product.

So what should you do if you see something like “B.F.”‘s comment?

First, call or email that person and tell them that you think they’ve been hacked. They might not know about it. Tell them to change their Facebook password, then visit www.facebook.com/hacked to reclaim their account. You should also advise them to run an anti-virus scan on their computer.

Then, make sure you haven’t been hacked. Go to your Account Settings, click Security and review your Active Sessions. You’ll see a list that looks something like this:

Review your Active Sessions on Facebook to find out if your account has been hacked.

If you notice an Active Session from another country, or you’re a devout Apple user and there’s a login from a Windows 7 PC, click End Activity right away.

For more warning signs and solutions, check out our article about How To Tell if You’ve Been Hacked on Twitter, Facebook and Gmail.

 

Have You Tried Raspberry Ultra Drops?

Was your account hacked? Did you order a free trial and get charged? Did you try Raspberry Ultra Drops or Liquid Raspberry Ketone Burn and actually lose weight? Comment below! We’d love to hear from you.

If you’d like to submit a complaint report, click here.

 

See Also

1 Super Easy Facebook Security Trick to Protect Your Account From Hackers
HCG Ultra Drops Linked to a Fake Fox News Page
Diet Lawsuit: Sensa Weight Loss V. Actress Octavia Spencer from “The Help”

Image sources

Web

Got a complaint? Report it to Scambook!

Author:

Miranda Perry is the staff writer for Scambook.com, where she blogs about consumer issues, fraud and cyber security. She hopes to inspire readers to think critically about the world around them and take action to improve their lives.

Comments

  1. Helen

    So I too ordered product $109. Drops don’t work. Trying to get money back since there was a money back guarantee? E mailed company and haven’t rec’d response. Want money back. Been in contact with my CC. Awaiting response. Yup feel scammed.

    Reply
  2. Christine

    I think my friend’s facebook got hacked because this “comment” suddenly was posted to about 30 of my statuses and I could see that it was also posted to my friend’s statuses/comments as well. Gross!

    Reply
  3. Edward Cherlin

    This quack remedy is based on the actual ketogenic diet, which you can find via Google and try out at no cost. It is related to the Atkins low-carb diet, which some but not all people find effective. The ketogenic diet is lower in protein and higher in fat than Atkins. Both induce ketogenesis, that is, burning of fat with a significant level of breakdown products of fat (ketones such as aceto-acetic acid) in the blood. This makes some people significantly less hungry, resulting in weight loss in favorable cases.

    The ketogenic diet was originally discovered as a treatment for epilepsy. We still do not know why it greatly reduces the frequency of seizures in many cases, but it does.

    If you still want raspberry ketones, rather than just making your own, you could eat raspberries. Berries with cream or sour cream are recommended in some ketogenic diet plans. YMMV.

    Reply
  4. Nick

    Amazingg news Scambook, Im already 22 pounds lighter! For the past few weeks I have lost a lot of weight. I have been using these new Raspberry drops I saw on DrOz. It really worked for me, let me know how well it works for you !!! Check the site out, type in without spaces ——> www [redacted] com

    Hehe just kidding.. :P

    My daughter is spamming this around right now.. currently walking her through fixing it.
    Thanks for letting me know how to fix it for her..

    I think I just found a new favorite bookmark. :)

    Reply
  5. Kolton

    Thanks Scambook, this is the first time I’ve seen your site and you saved me from this. Like the guy above me, you’re definitely being bookmarked. Btw does anyone know how they acquire the facebook accounts?

    Reply
  6. D

    I’d like to say thank you to the easy rasp hackers for ruining my facebook experience and for personally embarrassing me, Some older people don’t know that it is a spam scam and people have took it as if I was the one that sent out over 2,500 comments to over 250 people and for getting me banned from sending messages and comments for 30 days. I’d personally like to take you to court but hackers are faceless nameless cowards so that is likely not possible although I will seek out ways to do so because that’s just how pissed I am about this and I know I’m not the only one this has happened to but someone needs to put a end to this problem. I no longer have a facebook account because of this reason and fear of that embarrassment happening again.

    Reply
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  8. Barnes

    Then somebody please explain the whole Dr. Oz thing, because believe it or not him vouching is what’s actually selling the product. It probally was the icing on the cake for everyone who bought it, so was the product really a segment on his show?

    Reply
    1. Dan

      I heard Dr. Oz on the radio a couple weeks ago and he said that he’s never endorsed any product and that if someone sees his picture endorsing a product, they should run the other way because it’s a scam.

      Reply
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  12. David J

    Thanks for this post.

    I was having this exact issue with my account. It did take me a good 4 weeks before I realised the comments were posting on my behalf, and it appears they were only using my account to post the ads.

    When I went into the security/active sessions it showed an active account in another country with the time of the post directly matching the time of the last access.

    I figured it was a scam especially if they needed to hack my account to post :)

    Reply
  13. Betty France

    I don’t think they hacked! I think Facebook SOLD them the right to use our face and our name. Grrrrr! If I wanted my face/name to sell a product, at least give me an honest company and product!

    Reply

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